Saturday, 16 November 2013

REDKITE VERSUS CROW

Yesterday after work I went back up to Summer Leys, I took Breeze my Australian Shepherd with me so went off the reserve and around Mary's Lake. It gave her chance to go off lead, she's a good dog, comes to heel on command etc,etc...apart from a few small'ish flocks of Redwing and Fieldfare, it was bit quiet, 6 Golden Eye on Mary's Lake and a distant male Kestrel, I got up to the big lake behind Mary's Lake and found the two Redkites I saw on the previous visit.
 And was treated to an aerial battle between a redkite and a very determined crow who was trying it's best to mob the second kite.









 The turn of pace and agility of the Redkite is impressive at times it left me thinking "it can't do that", in the next sequence the kite comes from behind, then under and.....


 reveals it's agility, the next frame I call/titled "now you see it, now you don't"
 The kite got hold of the crow, sadly just two frames which weren't brilliant....

 Normally it's the crow being a pain in the backside, but this kite was determined to protect the other kite which settled in a tree, all took place a bit too far away for some great images but none the less it was a pleasure to watch such a battle and "have a go" at photographing, the dog got a good walk....eventually. The crow gave up.


14 comments:

  1. Excellent series of images Douglas. It's amazing to see these encounters and to witness how agile these bigger birds can be.
    I always wonder how much real aggression is involved in this behavior or is it just a display of bullying
    bravado?
    I'm glad that Breeze eventually got to have her walk!...[;o)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The kite had plenty of chances to let the crow go, but persisited in chasing it, so I'd say a rare chance to turn the tables and be a bully.

      Delete
  2. A wonderful encounter.
    I am always wonder why the raptors don't kill the crows and seagulls that torment them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. With gulls they are vulnerable at chick size, but once they get bigger, they too have sharp bills and feet, especially the bigger gulls so I think it might be down to not wanting to get injured, with crows I think they need the crow, often buzzards and kites won't eat carrion until a crow starts...a sort of modern day food taster

      Delete
  3. A great series of images, Doug. It almost feels like I was there!

    Red Kites are such graceful fliers, and it's always spellbinding to stand and watch them, but to get a bit of action like that too is a real bonus.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Richard, I really agree with what you said, they truly are hypnotic and spellbinding to watch, a great bird to watch and try to photograph

      Delete
  4. I love seeing the sequences of photos you capture! Fantastic! I have a soft spot for red kites. I don't see them often but when I do it is a real joy! I went up to Aberystwyth a few years ago to the feeding station and we saw how agile they were then!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cheers Lou, I think feeding stations are a great way to view kites, it really shows their agility off.

      Delete
  5. In comparison all my Red Kite images are totally pants, a great set Doug of one of my favorite birds.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cheers Paul, wish they were closer mind ,for some good quality images.

      Delete
  6. Scavengers old and new, dog eat dog and an age old battle .... excellent action Doug!

    ReplyDelete
  7. some very interesting shots there doug! would've been interesting to see just how far the kite would've gone.. random question for you though, I remember you used to own that big warm camo jacket and was wandering where you got it from? :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Tom, the coat came from the Gilders (the fishing tackle shop) on the Wellingborough Road

      Delete